By CBSLA Staff

LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health reported 51 new deaths and 2,708 newly confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus Tuesday, bringing countywide totals to 4,426 deaths and 178,642 cases.

A woman carrying her mask walks past a sign mandating the wearing of face coverings in an effort to control the spread of coronavirus, as she walks in Palisades Park in Santa Monica July 25. (Photo by Robyn Beck/AFP-Getty)

Of the 51 newly reported deaths, 21 were over the age of 80 years old, 12 were between the ages of 65 and 79 years old, 11 were between the ages of 50 and 64 years old, five were between the ages of 30 and 49 years old, and two were between the ages of 18 and 29.

Forty-four of those who died had underlying health conditions, including 20 people over the age of 80 years old, 10 people between the ages of 65 and 79 years old, nine people between the ages of 50 and 64 years old, three people between the ages of 30 and 49 years old, and two between the ages of 18 and 29 years old.

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The department also reported 2,051 confirmed COVID-19 patients were hospitalized with 29% being treated in intensive care units. There were a total of 2,621 suspected cases currently hospitalized, with 18% on ventilators.

Health department officials said hospitalization data remained incomplete Tuesday due to a lack of reporting from three hospitals.

Officials also said they anticipated receiving a backlog of cases in the coming days due to previous reporting delays in the state’s electronic lab system.

With testing results available for nearly 1.68 million people, health officials reported an overall 10% positivity rate.

Health officials continued to urge people to continue wearing face coverings outside of the home, avoid gathering with people they do not live with and keeping their distance from others while in public.

“As individuals, and as a community, we must collectively commit to continuously practice the behaviors that slow the spread of COVID-19,” Dr. Barbara Ferrer, county public health director, said. “Compliance with public health directives, containment of the virus, and collaboration across all sectors are key for us to move into the long-term recovery that we all want to see happen as soon as possible.”

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