LAPD To Maintain ‘High-Visibility’ At Large Events In Wake Of Vegas Shooting; Angelenos Undeterred

LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — A LAPD spokesperson said the department would “maintain high-visibility” at large events in the wake of Sunday’s mass shooting at a Las Vegas concert, as Angelenos vow the tragedy will not deter them from continuing life as normal.

More than a thousand people were set to fill the seats of the Hollywood Bowl, where Chance The Rapper was scheduled to perform a sold-out show Tuesday night.

CBS2/KCAL9 was at the venue ahead of the concert, where many recognized attending was accompanied by feelings of concern. While it’s a harsh reality, most people we spoke with said that wouldn’t stop them from having a good time.

“He asked if we’re still going to the concert and I said, ‘Of course we’re still going!’ and he’s like, ‘I wish you’d think about it…'” one attendee recalled of a conversation with a loved one.

“I don’t want to live my life where I’m living in fear all the time. I try to block that stuff out,” said Reuben Hernandez.

“I’m not there to be scared,” Collin Fontenot said. “I’m there to have fun — so that’s really what in the end I’m there to do.”

The fun has too often turned to tragedy recently: Pulse nightclub in Orlando; the Ariana Grande concert in Manchester; now a mass shooting at the Route 91 Festival in Las Vegas claiming the lives of nearly 60 innocent people.

The aerial gunfire at the Las Vegas shooting has sparked talk of helicopters, drones and even snipers as forms of extra security.

A LAPD spokesperson said while that is not in the department’s current plan, authorities would continue to remain vigilant and expect civilians to do the same.

“The LAPD will continue to maintain high-visibility at these locations,” the statement read. “But most importantly, we rely on Angelenos to remain vigilant and report anything odd or out of place to police or security officials.  ”

Paul Wertheimer, of Los Angeles-based crowd consulting firm Crowd Management Strategies, said mass shootings at large events also highlight the need “to take a new look at how we’re protecting people in crowds.”

“We can’t be carefree anymore. We can’t assume that the people who run, manage, staff the event even the artists are looking after are safety,” he said.

Wertheimer advises people planning to attend large events to research the venue, including its layout and history, eating a proper meal, wearing appropriate clothing (including sturdy shoes), bringing proper identification, medical cards and emergency contact details. Most importantly, he says: trust your instincts and have a clear and consistent emergency plan.

“Every time we get on a plane we’re told where the exits are and what to do,” he said. “Why can’t that kind of information be shared by audiences today?”

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