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Students, Tutor Allegedly Involved In Grade-Fixing Scandal At Corona Del Mar H.S.

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textalerts180 Students, Tutor Allegedly Involved In Grade Fixing Scandal At Corona Del Mar H.S.

 

CORONA DEL MAR (CBSLA.com) — A Newport Beach high school is being rocked by allegations that at least two students and a tutor hacked into a computer to change grades.

Officials at Corona del Mar High School confirmed to CBS2/KCAL9 reporter Jeff Nguyen that an investigation was underway.

Nguyen spoke to several concerned students and outraged parents. Sources also told Nguyen that the school was considering filing criminal charges.

The hacking allegedly started at the beginning of last year. It is not clear why the incident is only now coming to light.

Andrew Larsen, a 12th grader, said at least two of his classmates were involved.

“They were pulled out of class yesterday. I guess they were suspended,” Larsen said, “I think it might lead to them getting expelled. I’m not sure.”

Jack Thompson, also a 12th grader, was in the class when the two students were pulled out by an assistant principal.

“One student started to walk out, and [the assistant principal] said, ‘No, you’ll need to take your stuff. You’ll be gone for a while.'”

Tuesday evening, Newport Mesa Unified School District sent parents at the school an email confirming the investigation and saying it was a matter involving grades.

Parent Gil Cottrell spoke about the frustration of not knowing more.

“We have no idea what is going on. We know something bad is going on, we do not know [exactly] what it is,” Cottrell said.

Students told Nguyen that they believed a private tutor was at the center of this case.

“He is the ringleader and known for being a little bit strange, I think,” Larsen said.

Some students Nguyen spoke to also said the scandal could not come at a worse time, as colleges are now evaluating grades for admissions.

“People could get a bad image in their minds that could definitely affect their applications,” Thompson said.

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