Health

Do Facial-Analysis Diets Really Work?

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The Facial Analysis Diet looks at a person's face and complexion and decides on the perfect diet plan.

The Facial Analysis Diet looks at a person’s face and complexion and decides on the perfect diet plan.

CBS Los Angeles (con't)

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LOS ANGELES - In her two-tone, body-hugging, gown, Oscar winner Kate Winslet glided down the red carpet.

“Nervous,” Winslet admitted.

Nothing to be nervous about when it came to the form-fitting dress, but just five years ago, she was 56 pounds heavier, pregnancy weight. She said she took the pounds off with the facial analysis diet — a diet that looks at a person’s face and complexion to figure out the best eating plan for you.

The actress said in an interview with GMTV, “the weight just dropped off. My skin’s much better, I never feel tired. I just feel great.”

A facial analyst looked at Winslet’s skin, eyes and hair to see what diet would work for her. You can also do it yourself, according to the book “The Facial Analysis Diet” by Elizabeth Gibaud.

Doctor Michael Hirt of Providence Tarzanza Hospital is an internist, who specializes in nutrition. He says facial analysis has been used by doctors for thousands of years, but he says modern medicine follows up with medical testing.

“Most of use the face as a general guideline,” Hirt said. “Do you have a thyroid disorder perhaps, infection, chronic mineral deficiency; do you have a liver problem? That we can get by taking a good glance at someone’s face.”

The diet looks at skin tone, pores, dark circles, even hair, feet, hands and tongue to see what minerals are missing and foods you could be allergic to.

“I think it’s going a bit far to say exactly what food you can digest, exactly what food you are missing, just by looking at somebody’s face,” Hirt said. “To say peas not carrots based on chapped lips is a step to far.”

Author Elizabeth Gibaud says by looking at features of your face, you can figure out which one of her six eating plans is right for you.

For example, open pores is said to indicate too much acid in your system. Lines on the forehead equates to a diet too rich and oily. Red or puffy cheeks? The book says you may have an intolerance to dairy.

All face-type diets have foods you should eat and foods to avoid.

A type-one diet is ruled by the thyroid gland — you may have a shiny nose, fluffy hair, cold hands and feet, and dry skin. With that diet you must avoid mangoes, white flour, red wine, yeast products and chocolate and eat cucumbers, oats, apples, potatoes and asparagus.

Type-two is based on your liver, a thick and furry tongue, yellow skin and a red nose.

“These are non-specific symptoms, unless you were a reindeer.”

The type-two diet says to avoid oranges, curry, bananas, alcohol and coffee.

And remember, there are four more types to go — one just for men.

Now, to be honest, we don’t know what type of eating plan Kate Winslet was on; all we know is that she went face-to-face with her weight and took off the pounds.

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