(credit: Chris Rubino/shutterstock)

(credit: Chris Rubino/shutterstock)


Like the concept of a Hollywood movie, what you see is only part of the picture of the place some call Tinseltown. Indeed, finding the essence of the town we all know as the City of Angels takes a bit of insider’s insight as well as a heap of determination and desire to get on top of the right perspective regarding this beautiful Southland enclave. So, get in on a few local secrets by falling upward for the following five hidden outposts that allow you to view Los Angeles from a unique perspective.
(credit: Christina G./Yelp)

(credit: Christina G./Yelp)


Old Zoo

Every local knows about the Los Angles Zoo, located at the eastern end of Griffith Park. But few are aware that before this state of the art facility opened to the public in 1965, another zoo was where all the lions and tigers and bears were on view. To get there, head two miles south from the newer outpost along a trail that will get you to what is now an erie place to picnic (yes, tables are there for that practice, as are grills and benches) as well as to observe a lion’s den, a bear grotto, and a few abandoned cages that once was home to some monkeys of the primate kind. 

(credit: Gloria R./yelp)

(credit: Gloria R./yelp)


Berlin Wall
5900 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90036

Did you know that the longest stretch of the Berlin Wall outside of Berlin sits right off of Wilshire Boulevard? Well, it most definitely does! This 10-segment, 40 foot long chunk of concrete offers 25 tons of history and sits in front of the Variety Building. It offers a mix of original Cold War-era paintings along with modern design by L.A. and Berlin street artists. It’s one of L.A.’s most hidden treasures.

(credit: Griffith Observatory)

(credit: Griffith Observatory)


Berendo Stairs

A hike up to legendary Griffith Observatory is an every day occurrence for certain active Angelenos, particularly those citizens who live in Los Feliz and enjoy exploring their own eye-catching community. But those same knowing folks don’t just trudge up the fire road to get to this Los Angeles landmark as the uninitiated do. Instead, they choose to take on the 161 steps known as the Berdendo Stairs, which lead the way to some gobsmacking Los Feliz views and, ultimately, leads the way to the iconic Art Deco wonder itself. Oh, and don’t worry, if you get tired during this upward trek, you can comfortably rest along the way since benches dot the staircase charged journey constructed nearly a century ago.

Related:  Best Views In Los Angeles

(credit: ecna.org)

(credit: ecna.org)


Eaton Canyon Falls

If a waterfall turns you on, take a hike from a popular natural reserve that is situated near Pasadena. Officially known as Eaton Canyon Nature Center, you’ll wander along a moderately difficult back trail that is off the beaten path and family friendly, too. Sticking to that plan gets you to the rushing waters of Eaton Canyon Falls, a great place to stop and wonder at the nature of it all. In fact, you will probably be inclined to take off your shoes and wade in the refreshing water before heading back to square one. 

(credit: John D./Yelp)

(credit: John D./Yelp)


Greystone Mansion

You’ll have to make an appointment to discover this particular hidden destination located in the confines of upper crust Beverly Hills. Well, at least you’ll have to reserve a spot if you want to explore inside this ode to Gothic and Neo-classical architecture. But, if you could care less about the indoor aspects of this magnificent estate, then go any time during the day to stroll amongst the gardens and a huge reservoir on property that once belonged to the legendary Doheny family and now belongs to the City of Beverly Hills. 

Related: The Best Places To Spot The Hollywood Sign In LA

Freelance travel writer Jane Lasky, contributes to publications such as Travel + Leisure, Vogue and Esquire. Her weekly sojourning column ran in 40 newspapers for 20 years. Jane is anything but an accidental tourist and always travels with her pillow. Check out her articles on Examiner.com.
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