(credit: Baltaire)

(credit: Baltaire)


Ahh the mint julep. It’s the classic Southern drink that is offered at restaurants and bars across out great city and elsewhere around the country. Whether you’re in the spirit of drinking one because of the Kentucky Derby, or just because, we’ve rounded up the best ones that you surely won’t want to miss.
(credit: Baltaire/Kristin Teig)

(credit: Baltaire/Kristin Teig)


Baltaire
11647 San Vicente Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90049
(424) 273-1660
www.baltaire.com

For a great take on the classic mint julep, Baltaire in Brentwood is a must try. What’s unique about Baltaire is they make the mint julep truly customized to you by letting customers select their own spirit. Options include bourbon, gin, rum, rye, and even tequila or vodka. Mixed up in a gold tin cup, and you’ll feel as if you’re at the Derby whether or not you’re 2500 miles away.

(credit: Fig & Olive)

(credit: Fig & Olive)


Fig & Olive
8490 Melrose Pl
West Hollywood, CA 90069
(310) 360-9100
www.figandolive.com

Fig & Olive always seems to be at the forefront of great cocktails and food. And, their Fig & Walnut Julep is no exception. With bourbon, Elderflower liqueur, Port, muddled black mission figs, mint & lime, the drink is garnished with shaved walnuts. And, just like that, you have California’s answer to this classic southern drink.

Credit: Bludso’s Bar & Que

Credit: Bludso’s Bar & Que


Bludso’s Bar & Que
609 N La Brea Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90036
(323) 931-2583
www.barandque.com

Bludso’s Bar & Que on La Brea offers up something that no other place in town is offering. The mint julep here is special in that this BBQ joint actually taps its own bourbon drinks. That’s not to say the mint julep here is just poured from concentrate though. In fact, bartenders here put in a good amount of work and care to make sure your mint julep is better than others out there. From adding crushed ice to throwing in the mint leaves, this refreshing Southern cocktail is a standout. It’s even served in a silver cup for good measure.

(credit: Preux & Proper)

(credit: Preux & Proper)


Preux & Proper
840 S. Spring St.
Los Angeles, CA 90014
(213) 896-0090
www.preuxandproper.com

It’s no surprise that Downtown LA’s Preux & Proper offers up one of the best mint juleps in Los Angeles. After all, the restaurant / bar has southern roots. Taking over the old Parish space, Preux & Proper offers a menu that is all things New Orleans flavor including sharable plates like smoked shrimp beignets and crab cakes, fresh seafood sourced from the finest Gulf Coast purveyors and items like a fried oyster po’boy with crispy oysters prepared in a cornmeal batter served with fresh arugula and tartar sauce. So, you shouldn’t be too surprised that their cocktail menu reflects this Southern influence as well. Offering a mint julep daiquiri from a downstairs daiquri bar made with JP Wiser Rye, it’ll make you feel as if you just stepped onto New Orleans’ Bourbon Street. Curated by Pablo Moix, the beverage program includes other Southern options reimagined like the Category 6, or their take on the classic hurricane drink. And, if you want to step it up a notch, try some moonshine. They offer over 30 varieties.

(Credit: Rachael M./Yelp)

(Credit: Rachael M./Yelp)


Eveleigh
8752 Sunset Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90069
(424) 239-1630
www.theeveleigh.com

Eveleigh’s Peach Julep adds it’s own twist on the classic drink. The West Hollywood Eatery, which adds some peach to the drink, keeps it simple otherwise. With bourbon, peaches and mint over ice, this julep offers a smokey, yet sweet mix of flavors, ensuring you’ll want to hang out on Eveleigh’s porch all night long drinking it.

(credit: Wellesbourne)

(credit: Wellesbourne)


Wellesbourne
10929 W Pico Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90064
(310) 474-0102
www.thewellesbourne.com

Made with 2.5oz of Knob Creek Bourbon Whiskey, crushed ice, muddled sugar cubs, and a few sprigs of mint, this Pico Blvd. bar turns up the originality for their version of the classic Southern drink. In fact, using sugar cubes along with the mint is their way of honoring how this cocktail was supposed to be made. No one used simple syrup back then!

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