By CBSLA Staff

MARINA DEL REY (CBSLA) — Just one day after an investigation by CBS2’s David Goldstein exposed potential problems at a Marina Del Rey condo, building inspectors were on the scene Thursday to survey the property.

Buildings of the Marina City Club condominium development, an iconic feature of the waterfront of Marina Del Rey, Los Angeles, California, October 23, 2018. (Photo by Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)

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Los Angeles County Supervisor Janice Hahn brought county building inspectors to the 600-unit Marina City Club Thursday to survey the multi-structure condo complex.

“My concerns are that we don’t have something happen here that we’ve been watching in Florida,” she said.

The deadly building collapse in Florida certainly prompted the county to take a look at the condos, but the inspection did not happen until after Goldstein’s investigation aired.

But not everyone was happy to welcome Goldstein back to the property, with security officers asking him and his team to leave before calling the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.

Goldstein’s previous investigation uncovered a report from 2018 that called the complex an “aging property.” That report included photos of waterproofing cracking on the deck and leaking pipes below. Another report, prepared in April of this year, found that “nearly all of the waterproofing throughout the property on the recreation decks and tennis courts is failing in some way, with water penetrating the structure.”

The report went on to say that, over time, the issues could cause “significant damage to the building’s structural integrity.”

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When asked why the county didn’t do something earlier in response to those troubling reports, Hahn said, “That’s a good question.”

The buildings sit on land leased from the county, and earlier this year the county threatened to red tag the property if millions of dollars in repairs were not made. The county has since convinced the property owner to conduct a structural engineering study, which will take time to complete.

But, on Thursday, county building inspectors were on hand to take their first hard look at the conditions.

“Some signs of aging are routine, and others may be of more concern,” Steven Frasner, with the L.A. County Department of Public Works, said. “So our engineers will take a look at that.”

Hahn also met with residents and tried to address their concerns, telling them that the county was going to get to the bottom of the issue, but some homeowners came away more worried.

“I’m scared, actually,” one woman said. “After hearing it from her right now, I’m pretty scared.”

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According to preliminary reports from the county, inspectors found “no situations that would require emergency action or immediate impact to the tenants,” but they did find several areas where repairs and maintenance were required. The inspectors also instructed the property owner to “analyze each of the structures using a qualified engineer.”