LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — Schools are closed, but so are restaurants, museums and movie theaters. What will parents do with their school-age children?

With schools across California and much of the country working to slow the coronavirus outbreak, parents are putting their networks to work, sharing tips, articles, resources and videos on how to keep their children on a school-like schedule.

Many parents have downloaded a schedule posted by photographer Jessica McHale.

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Made this schedule to keep myself and my family sane through the unprecedented weeks ahead. Funny how everything works – it’s gotten picked up by behavior groups, doctors, teachers, and has been shared more than 10k (edit: 52k!) times that I know of. I feel like I just got an official mom trophy 😂 . Posting here because maybe it will help some of my family clients, too. I made it based off my kids ages and our family, use as-is or as a jumping off point for your own. Whatever we can do to help each other through whatever is coming! . I’d love to hear what you are doing for your kids? How are you planning to manage the inevitable difficulties that come with two weeks away from activities and friends? . Thanks Behavior Code and NESCA-Newton for sharing and for the thumbs up 🙂 . #chaosloved #covid19familyschedule #covid19 #lifefamilybalance #momboss @jessicamchale_life.loves.chaos .

A post shared by Jessica McHale | Photographer (@jessicamchalephotographer) on

The color-coded schedule incorporates physical activity, chores and quiet time.

“Children are used to structure and predictability, and this isn’t summer break, this isn’t where kids can do what they want and take fun camps,” said Dr. Roseann Capanna-Hodge, a pediatric medical expert and psychologist. “They are going to be returning to school, and keeping that structure in place is critical to maintain their learning in this time.”

Several online learning resources have made lessons free, including PBS and Scholastic. PBS has partnered with LAUSD to tailor their TV programming to corresponding grade groups, while Scholastic launched a “Learn at Home” website with daily courses for K-6 students.

The Glendale-based company behind ABCMouse.com has also made its site free.

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