SANTA CLARITA (CBSLA) — Residents of the Santa Clarita Valley are bracing for the first Santa Anas of the season.

KCAL9’s Jeff Nguyen spoke to concerned residents about the wild winds and how they’re preparing to deal with them.

“I got some granola bars. He likes granola bars. I got some salads for myself,” said mom Susan Cabrera.

Parents like Cabrera are bracing for what could be a rough start to the work and school week.

“I just received a phone call saying that winds were really gusty or if it got really bad that the power would be shut off,” Cabrera said.

No power!?

Southern California Edison says Foothill communities from Santa Clarita to Pasadena – could get their power cut off if and when power lines start coming down.

It’s part of a new state policy that allows for protective blackouts during high winds – as a way to prevent fires because of snapped power lines.

Following the heavy rain and lightning storms on Friday, people are concerned that the winds might be more intense than usual.

The official word from KCAL9 meteorologist Amber Lee? She says the NE winds are expected to be “moderate to strong, especially along the mountains, valleys and even some coastal areas.”

She adds, “The winds will start late tonight and get stronger as we head into Monday morning.”

Saturated ground and even slight winds can lead to trees coming down — as one large tree did in Hollywood hitting two cars.

Drew Kocak waited all weekend to get help from the city.

“They have so many trees all over the city that it’s taken a while for them to get here,” Kocak says.

The recent rain wasn’t enough to put a dent in years of drought – which is why unprecedented blackouts are allowed under new authority from state regulators.

Jamie Maggi and her husband learned about the possibility of a blackout from Nguyen.

“I’m going to buy flashlights. I’m going to buy little lights that click on the wall – you just touch it — for my granddaughter,” says Maggi.

Edison wanted to emphasize a call for blackouts will be done on a wait-and-see basis.

No matter how it’s decided, Susana Cabrera says she doesn’t want to be left in the dark.

“That’s why I’m here. Let me go to the store,” she told Nguyen. “And let me get a few things and then make him what I need to do so I can get ready – just in the event that it does happen tonight.”

Customers of the LADWP are not subject to the blackout warnings.

Comments (2)
  1. Jason Snyder says:

    As far as I am concerned, cars also can be a fire hazard. If they cut off power they should also stop allowing people to drive their vehicles during extreme fire conditions.

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