LOS ANGELES (CBSLA.com) — Animal shelters in the city of Los Angeles appear to be on their way to becoming “no-kill” facilities, with more than 84 percent of cats and dogs saved from being euthanized so far this year, according to the Department of Animal Services.

Dogs were saved 86.3 percent of the time, while cats had a lower save rate of 79.2 percent, according to figures released Monday. During the first three months of the year, 854 animals were euthanized, down from 1,226 in 2015.

The city’s latest overall save rate of 84.3 percent at its six shelters puts it near the 90 percent national standard used to designate shelters as “no-kill” facilities, according to Animal Services officials.

Animal Services General Manager Brenda Barnette attributed the reduced number of animal euthanizations in recent years to a partnership with Best Friends Animal Society, which helps place dogs and cats into homes.

The city has “made steady progress towards saving the lives of thousands of orphaned pets,” Barnette said. “We are hopeful to have our best year of reducing shelters deaths and increasing the live save rate since establishing to become a no-kill city.”

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