Elizabeth C. Reilly, Ed.D. is a professor at Loyola Marymount University, School of Education, Department of Educational Leadership and Administration.

(Photo Courtesy of Elizabeth C. Reilly, Ed.D.)

(Photo Courtesy of Elizabeth C. Reilly, Ed.D.)

Dr. Reilly a tenured, full-time professor who prepares educators for leadership roles principally in K-12 school systems and higher education. She is a recognized international scholar investigating women in educational leadership. Before entering higher education, she served as a classroom teacher, an educational leader in K-12 school districts and a national consultant.

She completed a Bachelor of Arts degree with a double major in English and communications at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, CA. Her master’s and teaching credential, also from UOP, focus on teaching, curriculum and instruction. Early in her teaching career, she completed the Administrative Services Credential with California State University, East Bay. She also holds a Doctor of Education degree in organization and leadership from the University of San Francisco.

What are the scope and responsibilities of your current role?

“As a professor, the three elements to my work are teaching, scholarship and service. I teach master’s and doctoral level courses in finance and human resource development, leadership and research methods. As a scholar, I research internationally, principally about women in leadership. Past studies have included investigations in Afghanistan, China, India, Ireland, Mexico and Singapore.  I will be traveling to Rwanda in 2016 to study women in higher education leadership. I am the author and co-author of numerous books on leadership. My most recent book, Women Leading Education Across the Continents: Overcoming the Barriers (2015) with Quirin J. Bauer, is available at https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781475802245 .

My service responsibilities include serving as Secretary-Treasurer of American Educational Research Association’s International Studies Special Interest Group and the Co-Chair of the forty-member Substantive Change Committee for WASC Senior College and University Commission. I also serve as LMU’s Plenary Representative and as a Jackson Scholar Mentor with University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA), supporting doctoral students of color in the USA who aspire to the professoriate.”

What is your favorite part of your daily duties?

“Mentoring and advising students is the favorite part of my daily work. I am committed to raising the next generation of educational leaders—individuals who have a heart for children and who know how to lead in a global society.”

Do you feel your education prepared you for your current role?

“While my educational background has been fundamental to my success as a professor, the years I spent as a teacher and administrator in schools provided the boots-on-the-ground experiences that educators face every day in their schools and organizations.”

Do you have any advice for people who desire to pursue a similar career?

“First of all, love learning. Professors and school leaders are excellent learners. Second, get out of your context and visit educational systems in other states and countries. It will open up your eyes to the possibilities. Third, don’t let anyone tell you that you cannot become a professor. Find mentors to help guide you.”

Michelle Guilbeau is a writer, reviewer, teacher and business owner. She also has experience in school administration, literacy coaching and is proud founder of CraftKitsForKids.com and MichelleGuilbeau.com Michelle enjoys sharing her knowledge of cities, food, travel, education and parenting issues with her readers. Her work can be found on Examiner.com.

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