CBS LA Facebook Followers Select Los Angeles Dodgers Ultimate Lineup

By Trevor Peele

The Los Angeles Dodgers are back in the postseason after winning the National League West title for the fourth straight year. Although the team has struggled to stay healthy — starting 15 different pitchers — they still managed to put together a remarkable season.

The biggest loss of the season came on the final game of the regular season as the legendary voice of the Dodgers, Vin Scully, called it a career. So since Scully has retired and the Dodgers lead the league in attendance (fourth straight year) we asked the fans on Facebook to vote on the best lineup.

Here are the final results:

THE VOICE: VINCENT EDWARD “VIN” SCULLY (1950-2016)

USA - CIRCA 1960s: Announcer Vin Scully of the Los Angeles Dodgers poses for a photo circa 1960s. (Photo by Sporting News via Getty Images)

USA – CIRCA 1960s: Announcer Vin Scully of the Los Angeles Dodgers poses for a photo circa 1960s. (Photo by Sporting News via Getty Images)

We know that Scully didn’t play for the Dodgers but the man has announced more lineup cards over the near seven decades he had been on the airwaves. Scully was hired while the team was still playing in Brooklyn and Jackie Robinson was on the team, so yeah, it has been a long time. Vin is the only radio announcer for any team that can say he has called games for every player that has made the Dodgers ultimate lineup, so he more than deservingly needs to be on this list. Thank you for making baseball music to our ears, Vin.

1. SANDY KOUFAX, LHP (1955 (BRO)- (LA)1966)

(Original Caption) 9/9/1965-Los Angeles, CA: In the dressing room late 9/9, Dodgers' pitcher Sandy Koufax holds up four balls with zeros on them, one for each of his no-hitters. Koufax threw his fourth no-hitter and downed the Chicago Cubs, 1-0, with a perfect game.

9/9/1965-Los Angeles, CA: In the dressing room late 9/9, Dodgers’ pitcher Sandy Koufax holds up four balls with zeros on them, one for each of his no-hitters. Koufax threw his fourth no-hitter and downed the Chicago Cubs, 1-0, with a perfect game.

Koufax took 47 percent of the fans votes, edging out Clayton Kershaw who had 24 percent. Koufax was not only the first player to win multiple Cy Young Awards, he was the first pitcher to win the award by a unanimous vote. He took all votes in 1963, 1965 and 1966. In the last five seasons of his career, Koufax led the league in era. The two-time World Series MVP ended his career with 165 wins and brought three titles to Los Angeles.

2. MIKE PIAZZA, C (1992-1998)

20 Apr 1997: Catcher Mike Piazza of the Los Angeles Dodgers steps up to bat before a game against the Houston Astros at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California. The Astros won the game 3-1. Mandatory Credit: Elsa Hasch /Allsport

20 Apr 1997: Catcher Mike Piazza of the Los Angeles Dodgers. Mandatory Credit: Elsa Hasch /Allsport

Piazza was able to beat out Mike Scioscia 38 to 27 percent for the catcher position. In his seven year stint with the Dodgers, Piazza was named Rookie of the Year in 1993 and voted to the All-Star game five times. Piazza batted .331 with 177 home runs for Los Angeles and in his whole career found the seats (HR) in 40 stadiums. In 2016, Mike Piazza was voted in the Hall of Fame as a New York Met. In his 2013 biography, Piazza made it clear that he didn’t want “LA to be stamped on his head for eternity.” Although there still seems to be a lot of resentment towards the organization from Piazza, fans still have a soft spot for the once beloved LA star.

3. STEVE GARVEY, 1B (1969-1982)

CHICAGO- 1976: Steve Garvey #6 of the Los Angeles Dodgers before a game against the Chicago Cubs in 1976 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Rogers Photo Archive/Getty Images)

CHICAGO- 1976: Steve Garvey #6 of the Los Angeles Dodgers before a game against the Chicago Cubs in 1976 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Rogers Photo Archive/Getty Images)

It was a landslide victory for Garvey as he took 67 percent of the votes. Garvey had a career that is often looked over by many people in the baseball universe. The 10-time All-Star batted .301 with Los Angeles and “went yard” 211 times. Garvey was named the National League MVP in 1974, the National League Championship Series MVP in 1978 and part of the World Series winning team in 1981.

4. JACKIE ROBINSON, 2B (1947-1956) – BROOKLYN DODGERS

circa 1945: A portrait of the Brooklyn Dodgers' infielder Jackie Robinson in uniform. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

1945: A portrait of the Brooklyn Dodgers’ infielder Jackie Robinson in uniform. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

When you think of the Dodgers, it’s hard not to have Robinson — who took 67 percent of the votes — pop in your head. On April 15, 1947 the Brooklyn Dodgers changed baseball and America forever as Robinson became the first African-American in the modern era to play in the Majors. Robinson primarily played second base but during his rookie campaign saw a lot of time at first base. On April 15, 1997 Jackie Robinson’s No. 42 was retired throughout Major League Baseball. In 1947, he was named the Rookie of the Year and with 12 stolen bases and batting .256 helped lead the Dodgers to a World Series title in 1955. There is much more to know about Robinson and it all can be found in Cooperstown (1962).

5. RON CEY, 3B (1971-1982)

CHICAGO- 1974: Ron Cey #10 of the Los Angeles Dodgers before a game against the Chicago Cubs in 1974 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Rogers Photo Archive/Getty Images)

CHICAGO- 1974: Ron Cey #10 of the Los Angeles Dodgers before a game against the Chicago Cubs in 1974 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Rogers Photo Archive/Getty Images)

Cey took over half (52 percent) of the votes beating out Adrian Beltre (21 percent) and Pedro Guerrero (20 percent) for the third base position. The six-time All-Star won the Babe Ruth Award and World Series MVP title in 1981. In 1982 he took home the Lou Gehrig Award. During his 12 seasons with the Dodgers, Cey batted .264 with 228 home runs and 842 RBIs.

6. MAURY WILLS, SS (1959-66, 1969-72)

LOS ANGELES, CA - OCTOBER 04: Legendary Dodgers player Maury Wills throws out the ceremonial first pitch to start Game Two of the National League Division Series between the St. Louis Cardinals and the Los Angeles Dodgers at Dodger Stadium on October 4, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES, CA – OCTOBER 04: Legendary Dodgers player Maury Wills throws out the ceremonial first pitch to start Game Two of the National League Division Series between the St. Louis Cardinals and the Los Angeles Dodgers at Dodger Stadium on October 4, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

It was a close race for the shortstop position with Wills taking 43 percent of the votes, squeaking past Bill Russell’s 36 percent. The seven-time All-Star helped lead the Dodgers to three World Series titles and racked up two Gold Glove Awards. During his two stints with the Dodgers, Wills batted .281 and accumulated 481 RBIs.

7. DUSTY BAKER, LF (1976-1983)

LOS ANGELES - OCTOBER 1981: Dusty Baker #12 of the Los Angeles Dodgers slides into third base against Aurelio Rodriguez #27 of the New York Yankees during the World Series at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California in October of 1981. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES – OCTOBER 1981: Dusty Baker #12 of the Los Angeles Dodgers slides into third base against Aurelio Rodriguez #27 of the New York Yankees during the World Series at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California in October of 1981. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images)

Baker took 49 percent of the votes, ahead of the 22 percent Matt Kemp grabbed. Baker joined the Dodgers in the ninth season of his 19-year career. In 1977, Baker was named National League Championship Series MVP and in 1981 took home the Gold Glove Award, NL Silver Slugger Award and was part of the ’81 World Series team.

8. DUKE SNIDER, CF (1947 (BRO) – (LA) 1962)

Portrait of American professional baseball player Duke Snider, center fielder for the Brooklyn Dodgers, in an empty stadium, 1950s. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Portrait of American professional baseball player Duke Snider, center fielder for the Brooklyn Dodgers, in an empty stadium, 1950s. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Snider was the 40 percent favorite as Rick Monday was close behind with 28 percent. The two-time World Series champion won a title in Brooklyn (1955) and when the team moved to Los Angeles (1959). In 1980, Snider entered the Hall of Fame and had his number retired in LA. During his 16-years with the Dodgers, Snider batted .300, hit 389 home runs and had 1,271 RBIs.

9. SHAWN GREEN, RF (2000-2004)

LOS ANGELES - APRIL 6: First baseman Shawn Green #15 of the Los Angeles Dodgers at bat during the game against the San Diego Padres on April 6, 2004 at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES – APRIL 6: First baseman Shawn Green #15 of the Los Angeles Dodgers at bat during the game against the San Diego Padres on April 6, 2004 at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty Images)

The right field position was a tight one as Green took 38 percent of the votes while Raul Mondesi was close behind with 32 percent. In his 15-year career, Green was with the Dodgers organization for five years. In May of 2002, Green had one 0f the most memorable moments in Dodgers history. After struggling for five games to hit the ball out of the infield, Green smashed four home runs, amassing seven RBIs and totaling 19 bases against the Milwaukee Brewers.

Trevor Peele moved to New York City from a small town in East Texas. He is a die-hard Dallas Mavericks and Philadelphia Eagles fan. He graduated from Tarleton State University in 2013, majoring in Broadcast Journalism.

Questions or comments? Feel free to follow Trevor on Twitter or send him an email.

Comments

One Comment

  1. Robert Strong says:

    I would have picked Kirk Gibson for left field even though he played for the Dodgers for 2 years.
    His hustle and attitude is what brought the Dodgers the title in ’88.

    1. Robert Strong says:

      Sorry……Make that 3 years with the Dodgers.

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