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Scheduling Shift Credited For Spike In Local TV Production

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cameraman shooting filming television film

(Photo credit: Christina Barany/Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES (CBSLA.com) — A sizable jump in the number of Southland television shoots in the second quarter of 2014 may be fueled more by scheduling changes rather than more cameras rolling, according to an industry data firm.

According to a survey (PDF) dated July 16 from regional film permitting office FilmL.A., on-location TV production region-wide – which includes both the city and county of Los Angeles and other areas – rose 33 percent compared with the same time period last year.

Paul Audley of FilmL.A. told KNX 1070’s Tom Haule the numbers could be misleading since some production was delayed in a previous quarter and others crews pushed up their schedules to work on shows slated for early summer premiers.

Paul Audley of FilmL.A.

knx logo black Scheduling Shift Credited For Spike In Local TV Production
KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

“We’re looking at it and seeing most of this is a result of a shift in when they’re producing television, not necessarily that there’s actually more television happening,” Audley said.

While first quarters have traditionally been busy seasons for Hollywood, more producers are beginning to shoot first-run programming for summer, which is pushing more production into late spring, according to Audley.

Researchers also marked a “welcome boost” for TV dramas due to the California Film & Television Tax Credit also provided a welcome boost to TV Dramas, up about 9 percent from last quarter.

However, filming in Southern California remains well below the peak years from 2006 through 2008, according to the survey.

The apparent gains come as lawmakers in Sacramento are considering legislation aimed at making tax incentives in California more competitive with other states. Assembly Bill 1839, co-authored by Assemblymembers Mike Gatto (D-Los Angeles) and Raul Bocanegra (D-Pacoima), won unanimous approval in the Assembly in May and is now being considered in the state Senate.

Known as the California Film and Television Job Retention and Promotion Act, the bill would increase film tax incentives beyond the current $100 million and allow more types of film productions to apply for the tax breaks.

For Audley, tax incentives are the one clear path toward bringing Hollywood back home again.

“History teaches us how quickly apparent gains in local production can be swept away,” Audley said.

(©2014 CBS Local Media, a division of CBS Radio Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Wire services contributed to this report.)

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