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Dodgers

Top 5 Things Fans Want To See At Dodger Stadium

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(credit: Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)

(credit: Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)

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Ever since Magic Johnson and Guggenheim Partners took over the Boys in Blue in 2012, Dodger Stadium has nearly continuously been in a state of updating, upgrading and modernizing. With new HD video boards over both outfield pavilions, a new sound system, upgraded restroom facilities, a kids play area and extended seating areas and bars over both bullpens, Dodger Stadium is finally becoming the place Los Angeles fans knew it one day could be — an aesthetically traditional stadium to keep fans proud, with up-to-date amenities and an unceasing goal to keep them comfortable. However, the oldest major league ballpark in the West can always look to the fans themselves to see what they can add to help keep seats filled.

We took a poll, asking fans to vote for one addition or change they would like to see at Dodger stadium. Here are the top five selections to receive votes:

1. SHORTER CONCESSION LINES

(credit: J.D. Cuban/Getty Images)

(credit: J.D. Cuban/Getty Images)

With 23 percent of the total vote, fans have decided the No. 1 change they want to see at Dodger Stadium is shorter concession lines. Sure, the Dodger Dog is one of the most famous and recognizable hot dogs in any ballpark anywhere, and over recent years, the Dodgers have become creative with the addition of “themed” dogs, according to the visiting team’s origin. We’ve seen the St. Louis Dog, the Philly Dog, the Pittsburgh dog and the ultimate ingredient in any prospective nap in the middle of a game — the Doyer Dog. However, it is not unheard of for fans to wait 15 minutes or more in line to get a bottle of water or a beer or nachos. By the time you get up from your seat to grab a bite, stand in line, place your order, put mustard on your hot dog, and come back to your seat, Clayton Kershaw has struck out the side and the Dodgers have just flied out 1, 2, 3. The stadium may look to hire more concessions employees or place additional stands for fans to be able to enjoy as much of the ballgame as they can.

2. SELF-SERVE BEER VENDING MACHINES

A DraftServ beer machine is seen prior to the 85th MLB All-Star Game at Target Field on July 15, 2014 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (credit: Rob Carr/Getty Images)

A DraftServ beer machine is seen prior to the 85th MLB All-Star Game at Target Field on July 15, 2014 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (credit: Rob Carr/Getty Images)

The second-most popular thing fans want at Dodger Stadium, with 15 percent of the total vote, is the addition of self-service beer vending machines. Target Field, home of the Minnesota Twins, will be one of the first sports venues in the United States to introduce the machines, according to an article on Gizmodo. The vending machines process will work by requiring fans to visit a register machine, attended by a stadium employee, to purchase a pre-paid card in the amounts of $10, $20, or $50 (fans must show a valid ID!). After obtaining their debit card, fans can pay a visit to a number of DraftServ vending machines throughout the ballgame and choose from a selection of beers, ranging in different prices according to the type of beer. Additionally, the cards only allow the machines to pour up to 48 ounces every 15 minutes. The vending machines could allow fans to have more freedom in their beer selections, and may even decrease concession waiting time! (See No. 1 on this list).

3. PUBLIC TEAM MUSEUM

A view of the wall of Jackie Robinson memorabilia at Dodger Stadium during the baseball game between St. Louis Cardinals and Los Angeles Dodgers on April 14, 2011 in Los Angeles, The Dodgers will join all of Major League Baseball in commemorating Jackie Robinson Night April 15, marking the 64th anniversary of his breaking baseball's color line. (credit: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

A view of the wall of Jackie Robinson memorabilia at Dodger Stadium during the baseball game between St. Louis Cardinals and Los Angeles Dodgers on April 14, 2011 in Los Angeles, The Dodgers will join all of Major League Baseball in commemorating Jackie Robinson Night April 15, marking the 64th anniversary of his breaking baseball’s color line. (credit: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

Most true fans of baseball have an ardent, specific respect and appreciation for the history and tradition of the game. Few ball clubs have quite as rich a history and tradition as the Dodgers. From their roots in Brooklyn in the 1890s to the major-market franchise they have grown to in Los Angeles, the Dodgers have a history that has impacted the course of the game that many other clubs simply cannot match. Of course, Dodger fans recognize this, and furthermore, they take pride in it. What better way to celebrate their history than to put it on display? The No. 3 thing Dodger fans want to see at Dodger Stadium with 14 percent of the vote is a team museum for fans to be able to visit. Currently, fans are able to book stadium tours. They can see the dugouts, the field, a number of hallways frequented by Dodger legends and players, and even the Vin Scully Press Box. However, unless you are cordially invited by those who run the Sports Museum of Los Angeles (the museum is private and not open to the public), the chances of seeing extensive, genuine pieces of Dodger history are few and far between.

4. HOME RUN FIREWORKS

 Fireworks explode over Coors Field after a game between the Colorado Rockies and the Los Angeles Dodgers at Coors Field on July 4, 2013 in Denver, Colorado. The Rockies beat the Dodgers 9-5. (credit: Dustin Bradford/Getty Images)

Fireworks explode over Coors Field after a game between the Colorado Rockies and the Los Angeles Dodgers at Coors Field on July 4, 2013 in Denver, Colorado. The Rockies beat the Dodgers 9-5. (credit: Dustin Bradford/Getty Images)

The Cincinnati Reds, the Kansas City Royals and the Angels are just a few teams to have launched fireworks to celebrate a home run. Fireworks are not altogether foreign to Dodger Stadium; the stadium puts on a themed fireworks show after every Friday night home game, but when the crack of wood-on-ball has a little extra volume to it, and a Dodger happens to send a lucky fan (sitting in the stands someone in fair territory) home with a souvenir,  there are no vibrant, blue bursts in the sky to contrast that serene Southern California sunset. With 14 percent of the total vote, fans say they want to start seeing home run fireworks at Dodger Stadium. If the stadium is worried that the plethora of Dodger moonshots will cost a lot of money for fireworks, they may note that the Dodgers are 22nd in the majors in home runs.

5. INCREASED SECURITY

 Los Angeles Police Department officers stand watch at an entrance to Dodger Stadium prior to the start of the baseball game between the St. Louis Cardinals and Los Angeles Dodgers on April 14, 2011 in Los Angeles, California. (credit: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

Los Angeles Police Department officers stand watch at an entrance to Dodger Stadium prior to the start of the baseball game between the St. Louis Cardinals and Los Angeles Dodgers on April 14, 2011 in Los Angeles, California. (credit: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

With 13 percent of the vote, Dodger fans aware of some of the unfortunate events of the past that have haunted Dodger Stadium say they want to see increased security at the ballpark. No doubt Dodger Stadium takes the safety of fans, both home and visiting, very seriously; it subjects fans to mandatory inspections before entering the ballpark, and it has a list included in the “Fan Code of Conduct” is read aloud during every home game. However, events such as the Opening Day 2011 incident have associated an damaging identity with the ballpark for some. By stating that they want to see increased security, Dodger fans are saying that they support a clean, sportsman-like atmosphere at Dodger Stadium, and that they agree we are all there together with the same goal in mind — watching baseball.

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