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Actresses Berry, Garner Call For Tougher Paparazzi Laws

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Actress Halle Berry made her second appearance before lawmakers in Sacramento. (credit: CBS)

Actress Halle Berry made her second appearance before lawmakers in Sacramento. (credit: CBS)

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SACRAMENTO (CBSLA.com) — Two of Hollywood’s most celebrated actresses went before state lawmakers Tuesday to call for restrictions on paparazzi access to their kids.

KNX 1070′s Jan Stevens reports Halle Berry and Jennifer Garner took their impassioned arguments before a legislative committee in Sacramento.

The actresses testified before the Assembly Judiciary Committee in support of Senate Bill 606, which would change the definition of harassment to include photographing a child without the permission of a legal guardian.

It was Berry’s second state Capitol appearance on the measure following a June appearance when she told Assembly Committee on Public Safety members the constant presence of photographers has made her daughter scared to go to school.

Her latest testimony warned of paparazzi practices that the Oscar-winning actress described as both a threat to her family and public safety.

“Sometimes 15, 20 cars create a convoy behind us, they’re driving at reckless speeds, they’re close to our car, they’re running red lights behind us, they’re cutting off other passengers driving, causing near accidents on a daily basis,” Berry said.

Garner’s testimony focused more on the impact she says aggressive cameramen have on her young children.

“My 17-month-old baby is terrified and cries, my 4-year-old says, ‘Why do these men never smile? Why do they never go away? Why are they always with us?’” she said. “Being stalked has been hard for me, but it’s beyond what a child should have to endure.”

The Motion Picture Association of America, the California Newspaper Publishers Association, and over 1,000 radio and television stations statewide oppose the legislation, arguing it would infringe on their reporters’ ability to perform their job.

SB 606 was originally introduced to increase the penalties for the intentional harassment of a child due to their parents’ employment after former LAPD officer Christopher Dorner killed the daughter of a former LAPD Captain in February.

(©2013 CBS Local Media, a division of CBS Radio Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Wire services contributed to this report.)

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