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Weinstein Company Bypasses ‘R’ Rating By Releasing ‘Bully’ Unrated

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Katy Butler and Terry Moran pose for a photo before a panel discussion after a screeing of the documentary "Bully" at MPAA on March 15, 2012 in Washington, DC. (credit: Kris Connor/Getty Images for The Weinstein Company)

Katy Butler and Terry Moran pose for a photo before a panel discussion after a screeing of the documentary “Bully” at MPAA on March 15, 2012 in Washington, DC. (credit: Kris Connor/Getty Images for The Weinstein Company)

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LOS ANGELES (CBS) — The Weinstein Company lost their appeal of the MPAA’s “R” rating for their new film “Bully” and have decided to instead release the documentary unrated. Industry experts say the move will allow more young people to see the movie.

“Bully” is a documentary about five students who have been tormented by their peers and the families now living with their child’s suicide.

Carol Eisner’s son was bullied in middle school and she believes the top is worth exploring.

“I haven’t seen it, but it sounds very important to me, and very right, and with a great message,” Eisner said.

CBS2/KCAL9 reporter Rachel Kim spoke with another mother who also admired the film’s message.

“I think it’s a great idea, I really do…my son was bullied and it was bothersome. He’s only six years old. It started at a young age, unfortunately,” Jessica Grossman said.

The Motion Picture Association of America gave the film an “R” rating because of profanity, which would make it more difficult for children to watch the film.

“The language is part of the message. The language in this movie is the language kids hear every day in school,” said Katie Butler, who said she’s been a victim of bullying.

Filmmakers decided to circumvent the MPAA by releasing the movie without a rating.

“The MPAA believes this film raises an important conversation on the subject of bullying in our nation’s schools and respects the right of The Weinstein Company to choose to release this film unrated,” the MPAA said in a written statement.

Now, the AMC chain of movie theatres has decided to let anyone under the age of 17 attend the film with a guardian or with a signed parental permission slip available on the AMC website.

An AMC spokesperson said they support the ratings system, but believe the movie should be viewed by anybody who can benefit from it.

“I think the little paper they’re trying to give out is really silly. I don’t think anybody will follow that, especially with a sophisticated youth audience here in L.A.,” Eisner said.

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