Deputy Under Fire For Endorsing Scientology While In Uniform

LOS ANGELES (CBS) — An L.A. County Sheriff’s deputy is facing an internal review after he was caught endorsing Scientology in a way that violated department policy.

Deputy Benjamin Ring appeared in uniform in a mailer for the Church of Scientology and the Sheriff’s Department is launching an investigation.

“You’re not supposed to be in uniform endorsing anything,” L.A. County Sheriff’s spokesman Steve Whitmore said.

Whitmore said officials questioned Ring on whether he knew of the flyer and that he had broke department code.

“The deputy, as far as we can tell, was enthusiastic about something that has benefitted his life. So, it may have been a misstep — we don’t know,” Whitmore said.

In the mailer Deputy Ring encourages members to invest in co-auditing services:

“What’s the point of having a condo in Burbank or going to Europe instead of investing in myself. Instead of flowing money into my IRA or 401(k), why don’t I flow money toward my Bridge?”

Whitmore says the flyer is not fabricated or photoshopped and Ring is still on the job.

He said the department has a strict policy about deputies endorsing products while in uniform.

The Church of Scientology has not responded to calls for comment.

Comments

One Comment

  1. bounce says:

    Yeah, who needs to put money towards retirement when you can hand it to an organization that started out as a practical joke for some dubious “auditing”?

    1. TheOtherVoice says:

      That several in this forum are unacquainted with the very tangible benefits that Scientology and Dianetics counseling has brought to millions since the 1950s is understandable. Anti-Scientology hate-groups rival the dedication of anti-Semites and racists. Too many journalists take their bait and forward their messages of hate and scorn, a la 1940s and 1950s mass media subtly relaying the prejudices of their day. If Deputy Ring is to be censured, the Department would also have to censure officers of every faith who, while in uniform, spoke of benefits gained from their religion. I’d be in favor of *a little* leniency here toward all religions. There are enough “unthinking” anti-religion slurs and overt hate-mongers in the world. Yet I’d still encourage deputies not to make a practice of it while in uniform.

      1. bobby says:

        look up the definition of religion, it is about spirituality and moral values. Last I checked, when you bribe a celebrity like tom cruise or the chief of police of LA to further your own coffers through advertisements, that is harldy moral or spiritual. They don’t believe in God or Jesus, they believe in kooky science experiments that appeal to celebrities, need I say more??

      2. Phil Ridge says:

        True religions don’t require that you funnel money to them for any sort of emotional benefit. Scam artists do that. “Instead of flowing money into your retirement fund, funnel it to US and we’ll make you feel great about yourself in return!” Scientology is not a religion. It’s a ponzi scheme

      3. MDWhite says:

        Yes…”tangible benefits.” Sadly, thousands choose to trust the fate of their eternal souls to the deranged ramblings of a disgraced, incompetent naval officer and science fiction writer who peddled self-help bromides to needy people under the guise of “self realization.”

        Scientology is a cult; it controls, dominates and abuses its followers and it is no more a genuine religion than the IRS is a benevolent charity.

      4. John C says:

        I looked into Scientology in the 1970s to help address chronic depression problems. I quickly learned they couldn’t help me unless I signed up for a beginning course costing $200. I told them I couldn’t afford it, but they said I needed to do it, and refused to let me physically leave the building until I promised to come back the next day with my checkbook. It was obvious to me that they had more problems than I did and therefore couldn’t help me. They continued to harass me for nine months with letters and phone calls to try to do in gauge me and entice me back. As someone personally acquainted with Scientology, my impression is that it’s a scam to separate you from your money, and you never get cleared so you always have to spend more. I wonder how much money the church of Scientology gives to support humanitarian missions in poor countries like many in Africa

      5. Scientology is a Lie says:

        @OTHER VOICE –

        Scientology is not a religion in any sense of the word. It’s a get rich quick scheme designed by a science fiction writer who never found an audience as a writer, but nevertheless was able to spin his tales and sell them as enlightened. Fools and their money continue to be separated by a government sanctioned fleecing ring that is devoted to nothing more than the almighty dollar.

      6. Rusty says:

        “The quickest and easiest way to become rich in America is to invent your own religion.” — Elron Hubbard, founder of Scientology and Dianetics

        “The most successful religions are those that forget their human origins.” — Max Weber, father of Sociology

        It seems Scientology may have overcome Weber’s rule regarding historical world religions. Everyone in Scientology is aware Elron Hubbard was human and he originated Scientology as a human. So what explains Scientology’s popularity?

        Hollywood celebrity would be a good argument, considering the vast majority of Scientologists who are known by the public are in fact Hollywood celebrities.

        But my argument stems from an investigation completed by Lawrence Wright who investigated the Church of Scientology last year. NPR offers the following:

        “Hubbard, the founder of Scientology, had maintained that he was blind and a ‘hopeless cripple’ at the end of World War II — and that he had healed himself through measures that later became the basis of Dianetics, the 1950 book that became the basis for Scientology…’I had found evidence that Hubbard was never actually injured during the war. … And so we pressed [Tommy Davis] for evidence that there had been such injuries and [Hubbard] had been the war hero that he described,’ says Wright. ‘Eventually, Davis sent us what is called a notice of separation — essentially discharge papers from World War II — along with some photographs of all of these medals that [Hubbard] had won. … At the same time, we finally gained access to Hubbard’s entire World War II records [through a request to the military archives] and there was no evidence that he had ever been wounded in battle or distinguished himself in any way during the war. We also found another notice of separation which was strikingly different than the one that the church had provided.’ Furthermore, says Wright, the notice of separation that the church provided was signed BY A MAN WHO NEVER EXISTED [capitalization added by Rusty]. And two of the medals that Hubbard supposedly had won weren’t commissioned until after Hubbard left active service.” (from http://www.npr.org/2011/02/08/133561256/the-church-of-scientology-fact-checked).

        This is striking evidence that undermines that “non-human origins” that are believed within the circles of Scientology. According to Max Weber, such incredible insight into the TRUTH surrounding Elron Hubbard should help turn believers into non-believers. But this begs the question: if an investigator found factual evidence that proved the non-existence of Jesus, King David, or Muhammad, would their followings dwindle as purported by Weber? I would think not, but the latter religions in question have also had thousands of years (respectively) to hash out any potential disbelief and to ensure the human origins of these religions have been fully washed away via translation, interpretation, and censorship.

        It is interesting to see where Scientology lands in this regard – it does not have thousands of years to bury its human origins, BUT it does have Hollywood Celebrity Star Power! Will this be enough to forgo such enlightening factual investigations as those conducted by the likes of Wright?

      7. Mike S says:

        Yes, yhe noise made about this points to anti-scientology hate groups at work. What a bigotry.

      8. Rsty says:

        “anti-scientology hate groups at work”

        If you consider NPR an anti-scientology hate group, then I truly pity you.

      9. xenu barb says:

        You don’t get to compare yourself with victims of pogroms and racism.
        Why?
        Scientology is no better, and possibly worse, exploiting people, defrauding people, intimidating critics and ex-members.

        The FBI is investigating Scientology for human trafficking. Remember what happened the last time the Feebs had a look? Operation Snow White got exposed and Hubbard let his wife go to prison while he went into hiding for the rest of his life.

        So you get a little buzz and think Scientology helps you. Does that mean we should turn our backs on all the victims its harmed?

    2. hugebrain says:

      look up the definition of religion, it is about spirituality and moral values. Last I checked, when you bribe a celebrity like tom cruise or the chief of police of LA to further your own coffers through advertisements, that is harldy moral or spiritual. They don’t believe in God or Jesus, they believe in kooky science experiments that appeal to celebrities, need I say more??

      1. TheOtherVoice says:

        Geez! Over-post the same message much?

        How many fake names and “sock-puppets” do you have in your “How can I make everybody hate Scientology” crusade?

        Your narrow definition of religion–must believe in God or Jesus–excludes Eastern religions with non-Western concepts of an anthropomorphic God.

        And you are very free with the hate-speech and unfounded accusations. Take a look inside. See where all that misdirected anger comes from.

    3. smallhands says:

      hi there, look up the definition of religion, it is about spirituality and moral values. Last I checked, when you bribe a celebrity like tom cruise or the chief of police of LA to further your own coffers through advertisements, that is harldy moral or spiritual. They don’t believe in God or Jesus, they believe in kooky science experiments that appeal to celebrities, need I say more?? thank you

    4. Chloe says:

      What is wrong with Mr. Ring talking enthusiastically about his personal feelings? Nothing. The police force has many faiths and what counts are characteristic like professionalism, honesty and team work. Should he talk about that wearing his professional attire? Probably not. I think it is interesting to find out what co-auditing is and how it can help people. If he benefits from that, all power to him.

      1. Duh! says:

        The problem isn’t that Officer Ring is talking enthusiastically about something he believes in.

        The problem is that he did it while wearing his uniform. This makes it appear that the entire department stands behind Scientology. You said it yourself, the police force is made up of many faiths. So what Mr Ring did was to disparage those other faiths by making it look like the department only supports Scientology.

        There is a reason that there is separation of Church and State. This is so that decisions are not based on religious beliefs because ones religious beliefs might be in opposition to anothers. Then you would be forcing everyone to believe in one faith. Did you know that in the US, there are more Muslim mosques per capita than any other religion? This would indicate that Muslim is the predominant religion in the US. Do you want the government to tell you that you must convert to be Muslim?

      2. xenu barb says:

        Using his uniform to advise people that they should give all their money to Scientology instead of saving for the future or buying a home is just wrong.

        This has nothing to do with “religion,” and everything to do with the fact that there’s a sucker born every minute and one of them might take his advice.

    5. Mike S says:

      I don’t think there is anything dubious about auditing. It is well described in Hubbard’s books and on sites like Scientology.org (http://www.scientology.org/what-is-scientology/the-practice-of-scientology/auditing-in-scientology.html)

      1. Rsty says:

        There may be something very dubious regarding Elron Hubbard though:

        “Hubbard, the founder of Scientology, had maintained that he was blind and a ‘hopeless cripple’ at the end of World War II — and that he had healed himself through measures that later became the basis of Dianetics, the 1950 book that became the basis for Scientology…’I had found evidence that Hubbard was never actually injured during the war. … And so we pressed [Tommy Davis] for evidence that there had been such injuries and [Hubbard] had been the war hero that he described,’ says Wright. ‘Eventually, Davis sent us what is called a notice of separation — essentially discharge papers from World War II — along with some photographs of all of these medals that [Hubbard] had won. … At the same time, we finally gained access to Hubbard’s entire World War II records [through a request to the military archives] and there was no evidence that he had ever been wounded in battle or distinguished himself in any way during the war. We also found another notice of separation which was strikingly different than the one that the church had provided.’ Furthermore, says Wright, the notice of separation that the church provided was signed BY A MAN WHO NEVER EXISTED [capitalization added by Rusty]. And two of the medals that Hubbard supposedly had won weren’t commissioned until after Hubbard left active service.” (from http://www.npr.org/2011/02/08/133561256/the-church-of-scientology-fact-checked).

        Any thoughts on the matter?

      2. Pam Ellis says:

        This has nothing to do with the story (A sheriff in trouble for not asking permission to be in an endorsement ad while in uniform)

      3. Stevve says:

        He’s a deputy, not a sheriff.

    6. Elena says:

      Scientology is a rather unknown belief system. Very good that one of the members is talking about it. The more real inside information the better.

      1. Rusty says:

        “The more real inside information the better.”

        You mean like the “real inside information” regarding Elron Hubbard’s ability to cure himself of being a blind and cripple (war injuries from WWII) through the use of Dianetics? OK, then maybe you can explain Lawrence Wright’s investigation into Hubbard’s faulty claims, because no-one else on this thread has even tried:

        “Hubbard, the founder of Scientology, had maintained that he was blind and a ‘hopeless cripple’ at the end of World War II — and that he had healed himself through measures that later became the basis of Dianetics, the 1950 book that became the basis for Scientology…’I had found evidence that Hubbard was never actually injured during the war. … And so we pressed [Tommy Davis] for evidence that there had been such injuries and [Hubbard] had been the war hero that he described,’ says Wright. ‘Eventually, Davis sent us what is called a notice of separation — essentially discharge papers from World War II — along with some photographs of all of these medals that [Hubbard] had won. … At the same time, we finally gained access to Hubbard’s entire World War II records [through a request to the military archives] and there was no evidence that he had ever been wounded in battle or distinguished himself in any way during the war. We also found another notice of separation which was strikingly different than the one that the church had provided.’ Furthermore, says Wright, the notice of separation that the church provided was signed BY A MAN WHO NEVER EXISTED [capitalization added by Rusty]. And two of the medals that Hubbard supposedly had won weren’t commissioned until after Hubbard left active service.” (from http://www.npr.org/2011/02/08/133561256/the-church-of-scientology-fact-checked).

      2. Pam Ellis says:

        Who do you think you are fooling?

        And he can promote scientology while not in uniform. Benjamin Ring appeared in the ad WITHOUT permission which he knew he needed…and that is the problem.

    7. Rsty says:

      “that started out as a practical joke”

      Lawrence Wright may agree with your assertions:

      “Hubbard, the founder of Scientology, had maintained that he was blind and a ‘hopeless cripple’ at the end of World War II — and that he had healed himself through measures that later became the basis of Dianetics, the 1950 book that became the basis for Scientology…’I had found evidence that Hubbard was never actually injured during the war. … And so we pressed [Tommy Davis] for evidence that there had been such injuries and [Hubbard] had been the war hero that he described,’ says Wright. ‘Eventually, Davis sent us what is called a notice of separation — essentially discharge papers from World War II — along with some photographs of all of these medals that [Hubbard] had won. … At the same time, we finally gained access to Hubbard’s entire World War II records [through a request to the military archives] and there was no evidence that he had ever been wounded in battle or distinguished himself in any way during the war. We also found another notice of separation which was strikingly different than the one that the church had provided.’ Furthermore, says Wright, the notice of separation that the church provided was signed BY A MAN WHO NEVER EXISTED [capitalization added by Rusty]. And two of the medals that Hubbard supposedly had won weren’t commissioned until after Hubbard left active service.” (from http://www.npr.org/2011/02/08/133561256/the-church-of-scientology-fact-checked).

      Not a single Scientology supporter on this thread has attempted to explain the above investigation. It is quite revealing.

    8. Oliver Asato says:

      I’ve been in Scientology for 30 years. The improvements that it has made in my life are very real. Do I care what narrow minded people think? No. I pity their ignorance.

      Thank you Officer Ring for sticking your neck out. Your courage keeps Freedom of Religion alive.
      Oliver Asato

      1. Duh! says:

        But is it Freedom of Religion when Officer Ring makes it appear that the police endorse Scientology and not the other religions?

        With the police force behind them, will they force everyone to convert to Scientology, or to the most predominant religion on the land? You do know that in the US, there are more Muslim mosques per capita than any other religion. So the predominant religion is Muslim. Should the Police endorse conversion to Muslim?

    9. Eddie Vroom says:

      I suppose a fair question at this point might be: Well, what *is* Scientology?

      Scientology starts with Dianetics, in which you learn that you have this “reactive mind” made up of Engrams, and it needs to be neutralized through a very expensive process called Auditing. Then, one day and a small fortune later, you realize that you have been “mocking p”, or imagining, your Reactive Mind. Then you are declared Clear.

      From there, it’s a mad dash to the upper, or “OT” levels. You learn of past lives, the Space Opera, Xenu and your alien parasite infestation (Body Thetans). Then wouldn’t you know it, just as it was with the Clear Cognition, you realize that you imaginated it all real good. Now you’re OT8!

      Then, they keep busting you back to OT7 so you can shell out more moolah.

      And there you have it – I’ve just saved you a bare minimum of $360,000.00

  2. stunned says:

    I find it very interesting that you can where a Police uniform in a gay march but you can’t express your religion. There is no department in California that would ever challenge a cop with a rainbow in the background, but anything else lets make an example.out of them. If I was this deputy, I would find a good lawyer.

    1. duh says:

      so is Christianity. and Catholicism is as gay and pedophiliac as it gets..

    2. Rusty says:

      You can’t control who you are attracted to. You are foolish if you believe you have any control over who you are and are not attracted to.

      You’re telling me you could control being attracted to a 245 lb male if you were sent to prison for 40 years? I mean the human body has needs….do you think you could “switch” to the other side for a few decades just to get your jollies off? I bet you might be able to for the physical needs, but for you to actually claim that you were “attracted” to Bubba is pretty far fetched.

      Lastly, the fact you brought up “gay rights is a scam” on a thread concerning Scientology reveals your prejudice for the ho mosexual community. Why so bitter that you need to bring up your “beef” with the ho mosexual community on a thread regarding Scientology?

    3. Pam Ellis says:

      You don’t think a police officer or sheriff who marches in ANY parade while in uniform does so without permission do you?

    4. Duh! says:

      You shouldn’t find a good lawyer, you should find the least expensive lawyer available because you would lose.

      There is something that is called Separation of Church and State. As a police officer, he is employed by the State.

    5. Foghorn Legghorn says:

      The comment from “Stunned” makes a good point in this particular case.

      Deputy Benjamin Ring had no intention of using a photo of himself in Sheriff Dept. uniform for the Church of Scientology mailer. It all happened because of a huge mix-up at the print shop.

      The photo of Deputy Ring that you see was only supposed to be on the cover of a brochure for an exclusive Gay Escort Service which Ring moonlights for on week-ends.

  3. Tony F says:

    I have to say that what “stunned” wrote is 100% correct. Im not a fan of this religious group but how to you say one is ok and the other is not????

    1. Mike S says:

      You can’t. He probably did not think that such a fuzz would be raised just because he said what he thinks.

      1. Rsty says:

        Try this on for size, Mike:

        “Hubbard, the founder of Scientology, had maintained that he was blind and a ‘hopeless cripple’ at the end of World War II — and that he had healed himself through measures that later became the basis of Dianetics, the 1950 book that became the basis for Scientology…’I had found evidence that Hubbard was never actually injured during the war. … And so we pressed [Tommy Davis] for evidence that there had been such injuries and [Hubbard] had been the war hero that he described,’ says Wright. ‘Eventually, Davis sent us what is called a notice of separation — essentially discharge papers from World War II — along with some photographs of all of these medals that [Hubbard] had won. … At the same time, we finally gained access to Hubbard’s entire World War II records [through a request to the military archives] and there was no evidence that he had ever been wounded in battle or distinguished himself in any way during the war. We also found another notice of separation which was strikingly different than the one that the church had provided.’ Furthermore, says Wright, the notice of separation that the church provided was signed BY A MAN WHO NEVER EXISTED [capitalization added by Rusty]. And two of the medals that Hubbard supposedly had won weren’t commissioned until after Hubbard left active service.” (from http://www.npr.org/2011/02/08/133561256/the-church-of-scientology-fact-checked).

        Or can’t you face the facts?

    2. Pam Ellis says:

      “stunned” assumes other police in uniform can be in parades without getting the OK first. So he is NOT100% correct.

  4. MW says:

    It’s what the children have to go thru that is disturbing. One of my friends had to run away from Scientology!

  5. jeff b says:

    It’s called a religeon for the same reason that “Qwanza” is acalled a holiday. Somebody spent a lotof effort promoting it. I don’t think islam is a religeon either.

    1. terry says:

      i agree! its just like all the other bogus religions, Islam, Christianity, Mormonism..

    2. Rod Anders says:

      Wrong. Islam is a religion of piece … here a piece, there a piece.

  6. TT says:

    “my Bridge”? Awesome, instead of preaching sound financial advice Scientology is using marketing pieces to advocate people give them their retirement funds.

    While perhaps this is legal this is surely totally unethical.

    1. www.ThriftyInTexas.com says:

      I wonder if the hollywood types are contributing (sarcasm).

  7. lyle says:

    look up the definition of religion if you still dont understand. religions can be founded by anyone fiction writer garbage truck driver it doesnt matter the time period it was created either.

  8. Mike G says:

    I always believed cops were donut sucking fools. This just validates my beliefs.

  9. Sandpeep says:

    I am no fan of Scientology, but why are they picking on this Deputy for expressing a personel opinion (while in Uniform) when the Sherriff gets a free pass to officially endorse Islam and CAIR? Isn’t that a double standard?

    1. Mike S says:

      That is my point too. He should be free to talk about his beliefs. Not a lot of Scientologists do.

      1. Elena says:

        No surprise. A bunch of haters will try to refrain them to doing so.

      2. Rsty says:

        Ignorance must be bliss, eh Mike? Neither you or Elena have chosen to acknowledge any of my posts. I wonder why? Unable to face the TRUTH?

        “Hubbard, the founder of Scientology, had maintained that he was blind and a ‘hopeless cripple’ at the end of World War II — and that he had healed himself through measures that later became the basis of Dianetics, the 1950 book that became the basis for Scientology…’I had found evidence that Hubbard was never actually injured during the war. … And so we pressed [Tommy Davis] for evidence that there had been such injuries and [Hubbard] had been the war hero that he described,’ says Wright. ‘Eventually, Davis sent us what is called a notice of separation — essentially discharge papers from World War II — along with some photographs of all of these medals that [Hubbard] had won. … At the same time, we finally gained access to Hubbard’s entire World War II records [through a request to the military archives] and there was no evidence that he had ever been wounded in battle or distinguished himself in any way during the war. We also found another notice of separation which was strikingly different than the one that the church had provided.’ Furthermore, says Wright, the notice of separation that the church provided was signed BY A MAN WHO NEVER EXISTED [capitalization added by Rusty]. And two of the medals that Hubbard supposedly had won weren’t commissioned until after Hubbard left active service.” (from http://www.npr.org/2011/02/08/133561256/the-church-of-scientology-fact-checked).

    2. Pam Ellis says:

      Please produce an ad with a sheriff in uniform endorsing CAIR or Islam.
      And then also show that is was done without permission.

      Benjamin Ring appeared in an ad while in uniform without permission…and that is the issue.

  10. Benjamin Brown says:

    Ironically, if he were supporting Christianity, this wouldn’t be an issue (then people would be mad that the officers were investigating him, calling it a plot to kill Christianity).

    Don’t get me wrong, both “religions” are equally stupid. Its the hypocrisy that is blatant and offensive.

  11. William Johnson says:

    What kind of religion costs upwards of $300,000.00 to get to it’s upper levels? Why pay so much to find out about Evil galactic overlord Zenu, or how the guy who made it up almost got run over by a train on Venus?

    1. Benjamin Brown says:

      Well, Christianity of course.
      10% of a $70,000 income for 45 years is about $315,000.
      Of course, most people start tithing when very young and stop when they die, so its a lot more than that.

      GO GO Christian Hypocrisy!!!

      1. jose says:

        how dare you point out the facts!

      2. VinnieH says:

        The money donated by Christians helps to feed and clothe the poor. It provides medicine and health care to peoples around the globe. Christians on missions build hospitals, dig wells and install water delivery systems. Christians are the first to arrive at scenes of catastrophe to aid victims.

      3. Benjamin Brown says:

        re: VinnieH

        “Church to spend $16 million dollars to move building 900 miles”

        http://movedbygrace.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/Church-Hopes-To-Move-Building-900-Miles_CBS-Atlanta_021111.pdf

        Yep, that sounds like giving to the poor to me.

      4. Du says:

        Sorry, Benny. There is zero requirement to tithe in Christianity. Zero. You also seem ignorant of the parable of the Widow’s 2 Mites. Christian hypocrisy? Your anti-Christian bigotry is showing.

      5. Mikey says:

        No hypocrisy. In the cult of Scientology, the more you pay, the higher you rise in the upper levels. That’s why they love celebrities, they have a lot of money. That’s why T. Cruise is such a high level member. In Christianity, you don’t rise in levels. You could drop a million dollars in the collection basket, and you’ll still be the same sinner you were before you let go of the cash.

        The money Catholics donate to their local parish pays for the utility bills and maintenance for the church building. It pays the salaries of the secretary, groundskeeper, and bookkeeper. It goes towards the priests modest salary.

      6. Phil says:

        Scientology Volunteer Ministers corps in Japan and neighboring countries were the first organized and helping Japanese quake/tsunami victims.. Christianity spends their money collected no differently than Scientology.

      7. Anon says:

        Agnostic

        10 years = $0 dollars

        Your all morons and scientology is one of the worst group of morons.

        Priests molest children and then cover it all up and no one cares.

        Christianity is used to send US troops out to kill brown people and no one figures it out

        Your all pathetic morons who deserve whatever the L Ron Hubbards of the world design for you!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      8. AeroJack7 says:

        And whom may the atheists tithe to? I am a devout Pedestrian who loves his Christian friends. Contrary to the anti-Christ folks, I find them to be on the whole a helluva lot better to live amongst than the latter.

        I find the Christian charities do a far better job than government in getting resources to folk in dire need. The Catholic, Protestant and Jewish charities work wonders.

        I am non-religious, but do ‘tithe’ 10% of my income to Catholic charities. They do fantastic works.

      9. Rod Anders says:

        Being a Christian makes absolutely no sense. Even Christ was not a Christian … he was a Jew.

      10. Mikey says:

        Rod, Christianity is based on the teachings of Christ, hence the name. He wasn’t just any ol’ Jew. He’s the Son of the Living God who began a new covenant. The old covenant with the Jews is over. The new Holy of Holies lies within every tabernacle on Earth. When Christ died on the cross, the temple veil was torn in two. The Holy of Holies was no longer there. Those who chose to follow Christ were at first considered a Jewish sect. They were soon called Christians. Within 70 years they were called Catholic. The Jews had the choice to follow Christ. They and everyone else today has the choice to follow Christ. Before anyone reject Christ, though, I highly suggest learning what true Christianity, what true Catholicism is. Don’t worry about the people, we’re all sinners. What is the faith? What does it teach? That’s what’s important, because in the end, it’s between you and God. What did you choose?

      11. Locutus says:

        Last time I checked, tithing was not mandatory for Christianity.

        On the other hand, the organization of $cientology charges for all their “help” (and I do use that term very loosely)!

      12. Benjamin Brown says:

        Re: Mikey

        Actually very little of that is correct, if any of it.

        There are no contemporary accounts of Jesus, the first record of someone by that name (Jesus of Nazareth) comes from the Gospel of Mark, generally believed to have been written 50-70 years after the death of Chirst, and by association, at least 20-30 years after anyone that would have known him first hand would have long been dead. If I were to tell you that my great-great grandfather, that I never met, was able to light fires with his mind, you would rightly question my 3rd hand account. Yet you gladly accept that Jesus not only existed, but brought people back to life, on the word of people that could not possibly have known him.

        As far as what Christianity teaches, don’t get me started on that. It teaches that slavery was OK and that slaves should behave and not fight back against their masters. It teaches that women should be silent in public and subservient to their husbands. It teaches that beating slaves is fine, just don’t kill them. It teaches that murder in the name of God is OK.

        Oh, wait, you mean your church doesn’t follow these teachings of the bible? Hm. I guess you are kidding yourselves that you’re true Christians then.

      13. Rusty says:

        Christianity is a form of control that has many unintended benefits. There is no “Requirement” that you hand over 10% of your earnings to the Catholic Church – I know I grew up in one.

        Although, Scientology IS a scam that charges individuals to first step inside its doors – $200 from statements made on this very thread.

        There is not a Christian church on the planet that charges for Christ’s teachings. I have actually heard the opposite to be true in some rare occurrences.

        Plus you never heard Jesus say anything quite like this:
        “The easiest and quickest way to become rich in America is to invent your own religion.” –Elron Hubbard, creator of Scientology and Dianetics

      14. Pam Ellis says:

        You do not have to pay any money from a christian church to get the low down on their beliefs, and while tithing is encouraged in several branches, you can be a christian your entire life without EVER paying anything.

        Scientology PR might say there are ways to get processing without money, but that is a lie. People that join staff or the Sea Org are promised free processing or at a reduced rate…but even that usually doesn’t happen.

    2. sean says:

      The money Catholics donate to their local parish pays for Lawyers for the boy raping priests..

      1. Rusty says:

        Yes it does. But that money donated by the Catholics is not REQUIRED by the Catholic Church, unlike the money that is REQUIRED to be paid by Scientologists who want to know the “truth” further. A personal account from this very thread claims the Church of Scientology asked for $200 to simply join as the beginning step into enlightenment. That was $200 in the 1970s. Imagine what it costs just to open the Church of Scientology door these days. Not to mention how much it costs to become fully enlightened in the likes of Tom Cruise or John Travolta.

        Imagine, Scientology is just one huge sci-fi story and must be the most expensive sci-fi novel that anyone has ever spent money on.

  12. John says:

    What do you expect from the wackos in Cali?

    1. Rusty says:

      I know…those crazy nut-jobs who are closest to ending the War on Drugs than any other state in the Union.

      Absolutely deranged, those folks.

  13. SgtRock says:

    What’s the difference? Marching in a gay parade or supporting the cult of Scientology, you take it up the rear either way???

  14. Brent says:

    Technically, Christianity in and of itself never killed anyone. It was foolish people who in their ignorance and misunderstanding of Christianity killed in its name.

  15. jason says:

    Technically, Scientology in and of itself never killed anyone. It was foolish people who in their ignorance and misunderstanding of Scientology killed in its name.
    Look I can do the same thing! great logic Brent..

  16. AeroJack7 says:

    As goofy as ‘Scientology’ is, leave the nut alone. If he is performing his duties well there is no reason to go after the guy. He should be reprimanded and just leave it at that.

    1. Pam Ellis says:

      That is why this is being investigated. He cannot be reprimanded without an investigation first.

  17. Michael says:

    There would be no problem if he was a christian, this is a total double standard and attack on scientology cause it’s a bit nutty.

    1. Pam Ellis says:

      Benjamin Ring is in trouble because he was in an ad endorsing a religion while in uniform without permission, not because of the religion he made the ad for.

      End of story.

      There are groups concerned with separation of church and state issues that are taking notice of this as well.

  18. Dan the man says:

    Nope Operation Snow White can not attributed to anything other then scientology.

  19. Hank Warren says:

    This is all about limiting Free Speech. After all, censorship is everywhere. The gov’t (and their big business cronies) censor free speech, shut down dissent and ban the book “America Deceived II”. Free speech for all.
    Last link (before Google Books bans it also]:
    http://www.iuniverse.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-000190526

    1. edward says:

      Go Hank! Your spot on mate!

    2. Rsty says:

      Hank, you are silly.

      Do some homework and realize that NO ONE is attempting to ban the book you have suggested. It was a terrible marketing ploy put in place by the author.

      You can find the book available on ANY eReader (including Amazon), which lends major credence to the idea that NO ONE is trying to ban it.

      Try again.

    3. Pam Ellis says:

      No speech was censored. Benjamin Ring could have been in this ad while not in uniform. He did so either because he wanted to or scientology wanted him to in order to use the “argument from authority” to push people towards buying their products (rather than saving for the future)
      Benjamin Ring knew he had to get permission to be in an ad while in uniform…he didn’t do that, hence the controversy.

  20. Pam Ellis says:

    Sheriff Deputies can believe whatever nutty thing they want. But if they are going to endorse it…they have to get official approval to do so in uniform. Benjamin Ring did not, and that is the issue.
    It would be the same thing no matter what the “religion”.

    1. steve says:

      no it wouldnt! not a chance would a muslim or christian ever have any trouble doing this..

      1. Pam Ellis says:

        Oh really? Please provide proof that other officers has been in ad endorsing a religion and paying for services of the “religion” rather than saving for the future…WITHOUT permission and no one called them on it.

  21. swathdiver says:

    This fellow shouldn’t be allowed to serve the public. Scientology, self-worship is of the devil. Man is not basically good, doesn’t he see that on patrol every night?

    We’re all depraved sinners in need of a Savior, Jesus Christ!

    1. the truth says:

      watch ancient aliens on the history channel

  22. Jopja says:

    I’m not quite clear about something in the video. There’s a Christian cross on the Scientolody building so isn’t Scientolody a branch of Christianity (like Luthern, Catholic, Methodist, etc.)? I just don’t understand why theres’ an X through the cross though. Maybe someone can explain all of this.

    1. jpc says:

      That’s easy. Scientology views Christianity as a wicked competitor that stood for all that the porn-writing ElRon hated.
      The X has the same meaning as a Stop sign. Read the crossed cross as “Christians keep out”.
      The Scientology “God” is a made up space alien from one of ElRon’s seedier SF novels. Proves you can fool some of the people all of the time, especially Tom Cruise!

    2. Mike S says:

      The cross on Churches of Scientology is not Christian. The answer to that is right on Scientology’s website.

      http://www.scientology.org/faq/background-and-basic-principles/what-is-the-scientology-cross.html

      WHAT IS THE SCIENTOLOGY CROSS?

      It is an eight-pointed cross representing the eight parts, or dynamics, of life through which each individual is striving to survive. These parts are: the urge toward existence as self, as an individual; the urge to survive through creativity, including the family unit and the rearing of children; the urge to survive through a group of individuals or as a group; the urge toward survival through all Mankind and as all Mankind; the urge to survive as life forms and with the help of life forms such as animals, birds, insects, fish and vegetation; the urge to survive of the physical universe, by the physical universe itself and with the help of the physical universe and each one of its component parts; the urge to survive as spiritual beings or the urge for life itself to survive; the urge toward existence as infinity, also identified as the Supreme Being. To be able to live in harmony with respect to each of these spheres of existence is symbolized by the Scientology cross.

      As a matter of interest, the cross as a symbol predates Christianity.

      1. Rsty says:

        Why don’t you explain this?

        “Hubbard, the founder of Scientology, had maintained that he was blind and a ‘hopeless cripple’ at the end of World War II — and that he had healed himself through measures that later became the basis of Dianetics, the 1950 book that became the basis for Scientology…’I had found evidence that Hubbard was never actually injured during the war. … And so we pressed [Tommy Davis] for evidence that there had been such injuries and [Hubbard] had been the war hero that he described,’ says Wright. ‘Eventually, Davis sent us what is called a notice of separation — essentially discharge papers from World War II — along with some photographs of all of these medals that [Hubbard] had won. … At the same time, we finally gained access to Hubbard’s entire World War II records [through a request to the military archives] and there was no evidence that he had ever been wounded in battle or distinguished himself in any way during the war. We also found another notice of separation which was strikingly different than the one that the church had provided.’ Furthermore, says Wright, the notice of separation that the church provided was signed BY A MAN WHO NEVER EXISTED [capitalization added by Rusty]. And two of the medals that Hubbard supposedly had won weren’t commissioned until after Hubbard left active service.” (from http://www.npr.org/2011/02/08/133561256/the-church-of-scientology-fact-checked).

        Since you are so good at explaining things.

      2. Pam Ellis says:

        Hubbard chose a cross to trick people into thinking it was related to an older religion. He also named it to sound like science to trick people into thinking science has some basis to his rantings. If it is science, it has results that should be reproducible in proper testing conditions. It does not. In scientology, if Hubbard said it, believe it. If you don’t…it is because you don’t understand it or you are a suppressive person.

        Also, this has nothing to do with the story. The story is that a sheriff was in an ad endorsing something while in uniform with getting permission.

  23. JPC says:

    This is definitely a case of auditing makes you more stupid!
    ElRon was a porn-writing, money-grabbing, two-fisted drinker. That’s a FACT!
    He invented Scientology during a long boozy lunch as a joke, found some people really were dumb enough to sign up, so he went for the money. Thr rest is history, and Tom Cruise.

  24. dahlia says:

    Limiting free speech? He can say whatever he wants, just NOT while in Sheriff’s Department UNIFORM!

    What I find truly intriguing here is that no one, not the Sheriff’s department, not the news organization, and not a single commenter, has broached the fact that this deputy, a public servant and employee of the County GOVERNMENT is using his official uniform to endorse a RELIGION. That is a clear violation of the separation of church and state laws.

    Or does the government make exceptions when the “religion” is followed by the likes of Tom Cruise?

  25. Seeker says:

    Take the time to read this FREE book about the TRUTH behind L. Ron Hubbard. It is TRULY mind boggling! To think of how much POWER this group has is, quite frankly, scary. One needs to stay FAR away of this group and try your best to keep the ones you love away from them as well. After you read this book, you will certainly agree that you would have to be crazy to come anywhere close to them! This is TRUE insider information that most all scientologists have yet to read, If they had, they would have stayed FAR away from them! Most of them are now stuck in the abyss! Sad but true!

    http://www.apologeticsindex.org/Bare%20Faced%20Messiah.pdf

  26. anonymous says:

    hahaa, i see that damage control is out in force trying to make their points for Staturday!

  27. Alvin Marcott says:

    I’m so sick of all this Scientology bashing. If you don’t like it, just ignore it. we do still have freedom of religion in this country, don’t we?

    1. Rusty says:

      Freedom of Religion yes, but when an organization proves itself to be beyond the scope of “help” and enters the category of “dangerous, corrupt, and misleading” the group deserves criticism until the group is able to rectify the reasons for criticism.

      One main criticism I have laid out above, which reveals Elron Hubbard’s lie regarding his WWII injuries that were cured using Dianetics. Research has proven he never received such injuries during the war.

      Another criticism revolves around the religion’s necessity for new members to pay money in order to join. What religion forces you to pay an entrance fee? Christian churches ask for “offerings”, but there is no financial commitment needed to gain the moral messages offered by Christ.

      In my view, Scientology is not receiving any more criticism than the Catholic Church does now. The only difference is the Catholic Church is vastly larger with SWATHS more money and power. Scientology may not have been found guilty of such abominable crimes as the Catholic Church has (see sexual abuse with in the Catholic Church), but there are MANY reports of forced labor within the Scientology circles out here in California.

      Now, if you are soooooo sick of Scientology bashing, I must ask you to do the same that you have asked of everyone else: “If you don’t like it, just ignore it.”

    2. Pam Ellis says:

      This has nothing to do with freedom of religion.
      Benjamin Ring could have been in this scientology ad while not in uniform. By being in the ad WHILE in uniform, it gives the air of authority and endorsement from the LASD.
      He did not ask permission as he knew he should have, and that is the issue.

      It is not rocket science.

  28. Harlan Breslau says:

    Scientology is brainwashing. Obama is using the exact same tactics.
    Check out what L Ron Hubbard ( or Obama’s mentor Saul Alinsky for that matter) recommends for handling dissent (“Fair Game”)
    Next step: Compare to the tactics used by public employee unions (Wisconsin), Hitler, Obama, PGP (Perma Grin Pelosi), Reid, Gore, fraudsters at the University of East Anglia & Genossen. Not to mention the army of Maher’s, Couric’s and Matthew’s, who refuse to educate themselves.
    Next step: WAKE UP! Please America, it’s really time to wake up. We had it all 75 years ago. No need to repeat – peace!

    1. Pam Ellis says:

      Put down the crack pipe.

  29. Mike S says:

    So what is this co-auditing the Deputy is talking about? A personal thing, it seems (auditing.org): Scientology auditing is a unique form of personal spiritual counseling which helps people look at their own existence and improves their ability to confront what they are and where they are.

    Scientology auditing can bring any person from a condition of spiritual blindness to the brilliant joy of spiritual existence.

    A person trained and qualified in applying auditing to individuals for their betterment is called an auditor. Auditor is defined as one who listens, from the Latin audire meaning to hear or listen. An auditor is a minister or minister-in-training of a church of Scientology.

    The Deputy talked about it in a flyer that went to Scientologists (who presumably know what auditing means.) I don’t understand the fuzz that is made about it. Many Christian or Jewish policeman talk about their beliefs to their fellows. That does not harm anyone.

    1. dahlia says:

      Not while wearing the uniform of their official GOVERNMENT capacity, they don’t. Freedom of speech and religion is the law in this country, but so is separation of church and state.

      This is a clear violation, and that IS harmful.

    2. Rusty says:

      “Many Christian or Jewish policeman talk about their beliefs to their fellows. That does not harm anyone.”

      The Deputy presented himself and his beliefs while wearing his STATE issued uniform in a religious printing. You can’t see the conflict in that? There is a reason why Law Enforcement are not allowed to wear symbols of religion while on the clock: they are not to wear anything that would distract the public from understanding their affiliation with the state and its laws.

      Considering the NECESSARY separation of church and state, this Deputy’s actions were not consistent with the parameters set by the State and its laws. OBJECTIVITY is the question here: was the deputy being objective while wearing the State’s uniform in the Scientology photograph? No he was not. Hence he should be vilified. Even if it was not his intention to offer objective, state sanctioned support for his religious message, it COULD be interpreted that way by other people. Which is why he, and others who are Christian or Jewish, should be vilified for conducting themselves in the same way the Deputy has. The State has to cover its own a**, which is why actions like the Deputy’s are considered within a spectrum of zero tolerance. This “religion within Law Enforcement” issue has been dealt with in the courts already and the State’s response regarding the Deputy’s actions reflect this notion.

    3. Pam Ellis says:

      No one here cares what scientologists believe, and it has nothing to do with the story.

      The LASD has rules about endorsing products in ads while in uniform. Benjamin Ring did not ask permission as he knew he should have, and that is why this is an issue.

  30. Rusty says:

    “The quickest and easiest way to become rich in America is to invent your own religion.” — Elron Hubbard, founder of Scientology and Dianetics

    “The most successful religions are those that forget their human origins.” — Max Weber, father of Sociology

    It seems Scientology may have overcome Weber’s rule regarding historical world religions. Everyone in Scientology is aware Elron Hubbard was human and he originated Scientology as a human. So what explains Scientology’s popularity?

    Hollywood celebrity would be a good argument, considering the vast majority of Scientologists who are known by the public are in fact Hollywood celebrities.

    But my argument stems from an investigation completed by Lawrence Wright who investigated the Church of Scientology last year. NPR offers the following:

    “Hubbard, the founder of Scientology, had maintained that he was blind and a ‘hopeless cripple’ at the end of World War II — and that he had healed himself through measures that later became the basis of Dianetics, the 1950 book that became the basis for Scientology…’I had found evidence that Hubbard was never actually injured during the war. … And so we pressed [Tommy Davis] for evidence that there had been such injuries and [Hubbard] had been the war hero that he described,’ says Wright. ‘Eventually, Davis sent us what is called a notice of separation — essentially discharge papers from World War II — along with some photographs of all of these medals that [Hubbard] had won. … At the same time, we finally gained access to Hubbard’s entire World War II records [through a request to the military archives] and there was no evidence that he had ever been wounded in battle or distinguished himself in any way during the war. We also found another notice of separation which was strikingly different than the one that the church had provided.’ Furthermore, says Wright, the notice of separation that the church provided was signed BY A MAN WHO NEVER EXISTED [capitalization added by Rusty]. And two of the medals that Hubbard supposedly had won weren’t commissioned until after Hubbard left active service.” (from http://www.npr.org/2011/02/08/133561256/the-church-of-scientology-fact-checked).

    This is striking evidence that undermines that “non-human origins” that are believed within the circles of Scientology. According to Max Weber, such incredible insight into the TRUTH surrounding Elron Hubbard should help turn believers into non-believers. But this begs the question: if an investigator found factual evidence that proved the non-existence of Jesus, King David, or Muhammad, would their followings dwindle as purported by Weber? I would think not, but the latter religions in question have also had thousands of years (respectively) to hash out any potential disbelief and to ensure the human origins of these religions have been fully washed away via translation, interpretation, and censorship.

  31. swhitS says:

    What’s wrong with being in uniform lots of uniformed and authorities say what they feel/personal stuff, how many politicians serving the public speak about religion or is there a law against that now?

    1. Pam Ellis says:

      The LASD has rules for endorsing products while in uniform. This is an issue because Benjamin Ring did not ask permission. He cannot pretend to not have known the rules.

  32. TrendyT says:

    It is a Satanic cult. Too many years in a cult can warp your mind to the true meaning of Jesus.
    Caution: Just because idiot Hollywood types follow Satan does not Scientology the religion of the right way.

    1. Pam Ellis says:

      scientologists do not believe in satan. Satan is a christian diety.

  33. baca says:

    but they can commit murder in a uniform and theres is no problem

  34. calvin worthington says:

    The Los Angeles County Sheriff Department is a wholly owned subsidiary of The Church of Scientology, Inc., LRH technologies, the Bridge Inc..

    Sheriff Lee Baca is a member of LRH upper echelon. Steve Whitmore is L.A. County Sheriff Dept. spokesman and LRH, Inc. Minister of Information.

    Proceeds from narcotics sales, search warrant asset confiscations and human trafficking can be laundered as cash donations to Church of Scientolgy, Inc. to fund operations and real estate acquisitions..

    L.A. County Sheriff’s Dept. now has special services division to conduct ” life elimination operations” on request of platinum level church members. Because of unique sataus as law enforcement agency the Sheriff’s Dept. can carry-out this service through “staged’ fatal accidents, fluke officer Involved shootings and apparent narcotic robbery related murders.

    Over previous 18 months there have been 4 incidents resulting in 7 deaths attributable to this clandestine operation conducted solely at request of LRH and supervised directly from Sheriff’s Dept’ HQ.

  35. calvin worthington says:

    Not only has Deputy Ring violated LASD codes by appearing in department uniform as part of a direct mail solicitation.

    Deuty Ring directly places the Bridge alongside the I.R.A. and the 401(K), therefore Ring and the producers of the solicitation are blatantly violating Federal Regulations on the sales of unregistered securities by unlicensed brokers. Ring should be fired by the Sheriff and prosecuted by the Justice Dept.

    3 years in Federal prison will help Ring take off some of that extra weight.

  36. calvin worthington says:

    The deputy, as far as we can tell, was enthusiastic about something that has benefitted his life. So, it may have been a misstep — we don’t know,” Whitmore said.

    In this single quote we are being told two things by Sheriff Dept. Spokesman Steve Whitmore that should be shocking to every citizen:

    1. Dep. Ben Ring broke department code and it is being investigated, but we already know nothing will come of it.

    2. In speaking about the investiagation of Dep. Ring, Steve Whitmore has blatantly used his press response as a tool to get free exposure for a promotion of the benefits of Scientology.

    Utterly Crass.

    Thoroughly disgusting.

  37. HisDog Spot says:

    Let’s not forget that Sheriff Lee Baca is the most egregious violator of the Sheriff Dept. codes on improper and unethical use of the uniform.

    When Sheriff Lee Baca makes appeals to registered California voters to Vote No on Proposition 19 he is wearing his uniform.

    Sheriff Baca knows full well that he is entitled to exercise his right of free speech as an individual in support of or in opposition to a ballot initiative, but he should not be using his uniform to make political endorsements.

    Sheriff Baca may appear as an individual citizen to endorse candidates for office, but it is improper to misuse his uniform for that purpose.

    Sheriff Baca doesn’t care what is proper when it comes his turn to pimp out the tan and greens of the Sheriff Dept. to gain some extra votes for his lapdog L.A. County District Attorney Steve (Bow-Wow) Cooley.

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