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Beck Pledges To Stop LAPD Profiling After DOJ Complaints

Chief: 'Ultimate goal would be to have none'
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LAPD Chief Charlie Beck (Photo credit: David McNew/Getty Images)

LAPD Chief Charlie Beck (Photo credit: David McNew/Getty Images)

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LOS ANGELES (CBS) — Los Angeles police Chief Charlie Beck on Tuesday defended his department against biased-policing complaints, and stated that “the ultimate goal would be to have none.”

KNX 1070′s John Brooks reports

“It is the department’s goal to not only improve the quality of the investigative process, but also to reduce the number of biased policing complaints,” Beck said in a statement. “The ultimate goal would be to have none.”

The watchdog for the Los Angeles Police Commission, as well as LAPD officials, this week largely defended the handling of racial profiling investigations in response to criticism from the U.S. Department of Justice.

Nicole Bershon, the Police Commission’s inspector general, is scheduled to present the civilian oversight panel today with a report that evaluates how a newly formed LAPD unit investigates claims of racial profiling against
officers, The Los Angeles Times reported.

The review follows a warning last month from Justice Department officials to Bershon and the LAPD that both were falling short in addressing racial profiling complaints.

After completing sweeping reforms ordered by federal officials, the LAPD still remains under federal supervision on a handful of issues, including racial profiling, and must persuade the Justice Department that it can adequately police itself before federal scrutiny can be withdrawn.

Within the LAPD, racial profiling is termed “biased policing.”

Complaints typically occur after a traffic or pedestrian stop, when the officer is accused of targeting a person solely because of his or her race, ethnicity, religious garb or some other form of outward appearance.

(©2010 CBS Local Media, a division of CBS Radio Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Wire services contributed to this report.)

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